Friday, April 8, 2011

Anthony's Pizza

Today was rainy, so I was destined for lounging and relaxing. I ordered delivery from Anthony's Pizza. I saw the new restaurant on DubVMenus.com and wanted to see what it was about. I ordered a half Sicilian pizza and an Italian "wedgie," which is basically a lettuce, tomato, mayo, salami sandwich with pizza flatbread as the bread, with ricotta, garlic and spinach. Because I ordered on DubVMenus, I was also able to get a free two-liter. Not a bad deal. The total came out (with tip) to about $20, and the food was delivered in about an hour.

I bit into the wedgie and was a bit confused. First of all, it was warm and was lacking all the "basic" ingredients the description said it would come with: tomato, lettuce and onion. Instead, it only contained the optional ingredients: mayo, ricotta, spinach and garlic. Luckily, when I tasted it, it was not bad. It wasn't what I ordered or expected, but it was essentially a calzone that wasn't sealed around the edges. But, then I got to thinking - this meal is warm, and it has mayo on it. Since it was already messed up, I was concerned they put it through the oven with mayo, which would lead to food poisoning - one of the most unpleasant things I've ever experienced. So, I called the restaurant to ask them what was up. They basically said I somehow ordered it wrong, though I ordered it online and it gave me a receipt saying exactly what was being processed. Anyway, they said they didn't put the sandwich with mayo through the oven. I supposed we'll find out in approximately 5 to 7 hours.

The pizza was better. Sicilian pizza is "poo- fier." The dough was about an inch thick, with spiced Italian sauce and melty mozzarella cheese. I prefer a bit less doughy pizza, but it was still very tasty. The blend of herbs and spices in the pizza sauce gave it a flavorful Italian taste without being too spicy or overseasoned. The taste is similar to DiCarlo's in the northern panhandle, but the dough is much fluffier. The restaurant would have received a better score if there wasn't the debacle with the wedgie.

Grade: C

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4 comments:

  1. How would cooking mayo lead to food poisoning? I use mayo in many recipes including crabcakes and salmon cakes which are then baked in the over or fried.

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  2. It wouldn't necessarily "lead" to food poisoning, but it could. And, it would be very unlikely, but I was just a little too concerned about it. I think it was more the fact that I didn't really know exactly what was going on with the sandwich because it wasn't what I ordered, and when it comes to food poisoning, I don't take any chances. You can definitely baked things with mayo in them, and it can even get warm, but since I really didn't know what happened, I was more worried. Thanks for your comment!

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  3. I'm sorry, but modern day mayo is not going to give you food poisoning. Mayonaisse has had little risk of causing food poisoning for quite some time. If they were making their own mayo in house then maybe it could give u food poisoning but modern mayo is pasturised giving its ph little chance to allow an enviornment for bacteria much less all of the oils and perservatives that would be in it, having the same effeffects. Also, your idea that cooking it first would increase the risk is also archaic. It was a fear back when most people had to make mayo from scratch and once it reached room temp with in pasturised eggs it could easily grow bacteria.

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    1. If you look at my previous comment, you can see that I said it wouldn't absolutely lead to it, but there is a possibility. And after having a bad case of food poisoning, I didn't want to risk it - especially on something like that. Thanks.

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